​Why Cloud is a Right Time, Right Place Kind of Offering…

28th April 2015

It's like we finally arrived. Perhaps nothing has truly changed the way video is used and perceived more than cloud. Dan Newman explains why cloud is the ultimate tool for allowing video to be utilized in the way that makes the most sense to each and every organization.

How it was before …

Just 27 minutes after we sat down at the conference room table, we are on our video call and everyone can hear, see and participate. This isn’t a videoconference; it’s a disaster.

For early adopters of video, they may recall this. Remember the “I can see you but can’t hear you, and the I can hear you, but can’t see
you calls?” If you didn’t have a person setting up the video call an hour beforehand, you could pretty much count on this. Then…we evolved.

Have we arrived? Video makes a leap

Suddenly in the past few years we have taken a leap. We are seeing enterprise technology and consumer technology intersecting and it has become difficult to know which one is driving adoption. However, adoption has come. From a pure user standpoint nothing has been more impactful than Skype, FaceTime and Google for making consumers aware of video. On the other hand, the enterprise has seen amazing advances as well. Cisco, Polycom and Microsoft have put video in some way, shape or form onto every desktop.

But What About Data, Privacy and Security?

One of the biggest challenges with our evolved perception of video is that the very services that helped so many of us become “believers”
are also problematic for almost any enterprise with goals of keeping their data private and their network secure. While few of us ever actually read the terms of service, if you were to check out what Skype or Google+ are offering, you would find out that your data and your calls are anything but private. Some people may not care, but I would believe that most organizations would want to control the data and content of their private business conversations.

This is where the rub is. The technology has evolved, and consumer/enterprise solutions are merging, but really for the enterprise what they need is the ability to choose their level of privacy, security and of course investment in making video work for them.

Enter … Right Time for Cloud Videoconferencing

Perhaps nothing has truly changed the way video is used and perceived more than cloud. While to some extent there are still some remaining challenges to tie together free, freemium and enterprise versions of video communications, the cloud is providing a new level of accessibility that can truly provide ubiquity between organizations that may not have a massive investment in video and those that have full deployments.

With the cloud, companies can pick what is important to them such as privacy, availability or mobility and deploy solutions that support
those initiatives. Is brower based video (WebRTC) a critical component? Is interoperability between traditional videoconferencing systems (e.g. Cisco and Polycom) and products like Skype for Business the business challenge? Then subscribe to a solution that enables these capabilities. What about simple invitations and ways for users to meet with a click or two and then self-manage their conference? Maybe a VMR solution is the way to go.

Bottom line, cloud may just be the ultimate tool for allowing video to be utilized in the way that makes the most sense to each and every organization. With flexible consumption and solutions that meet most budgets and needs, video no longer has to be a challenge or even a question for organizations. Now we can focus on collaboration that gets business done faster and more effectively. After all, isn’t that why we invest in this stuff?

dan-newman_1.jpg#asset:536

After 12 years of running technology companies, Daniel Newman traded the corner office for a chance to drive the discussion on how the digital economy is going to forever change how business is done. Daniel is a Forbes, Entrepreneur and Huffington Post contributor and a published author of "The Millennial CEO" and "The New Rules of Customer Engagement."